Sign in to follow this  
Denali

Southwest 737 Max makes emergency landing in Orlando

Recommended Posts

https://www.yahoo.com/news/southwest-737-max-makes-emergency-211314603.html

 

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max made a safe emergency landing Tuesday in Orlando, Florida, after experiencing an engine problem, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Now it's engine problems.  That doesn't sound like an MCAS issue to me.  To call the 737 Max a lemon is an insult to lemons.  Nice job, Boeing.

 

Edited by Denali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, titanruss said:

i thought they grounded all of these?

 

No passengers were on board, and the aircraft was being ferried to Victorville, California, where Southwest is storing the airplanes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Denali said:

No passengers were on board, and the aircraft was being ferried to Victorville, California, where Southwest is storing the airplanes.

yeah i just read that. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, CreepingDeath said:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I read somewhere that the gov. shutdown affected the necessary repairs/upkeep of many planes.

It's not my job to correct outrageously retarded remarks.  I have better things to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, CreepingDeath said:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I read somewhere that the gov. shutdown affected the necessary repairs/upkeep of many planes.

Yes, many inspections were missed due to the shutdown but doubtful it's the reason Boeing is having so many problems

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because I'm bored.

 

This essentially says that Boeing needed an aircraft with a stronger and more efficient engine to compete with competitors. So instead of designing a whole new aircraft, they took their 737 and put a bigger engine on it. 

 

This isn't really a horrible idea. The problem is that the plane wasn't designed for that size engine which meant the aero was a little off and it would stall at higher angles of attack. Angle of attack is essentially the angle of the wings in respect to the air flow. When you pitched up enough, the wings would stall and they'd lose lift.

 

Stick your hand out the window of a car and tilt it up. That's the angle of attack. Pitch it up more and more and at some point you'll stop feeling the air lifting your hand and you'll just feel the air pushing your hand back. That point, without getting too in depth, is basically stall.

 

So basically what they did was figured out what conditions the aircraft would start to stall and created software (MCAS) so the aircraft would autocorrect for it. This isn't typically a huge deal bc commercial aircraft don't really pitch up that drastically so they don't really stall often. They probably figured it'd never really happen (and actually it didn't).

 

Then they figured current 737 pilots would just need a run down of the changes with brief training to be up to speed.

 

The problem was 2 fold.

 

1) faulty sensors could make the plane incorrectly read that it was going into a stall

2) when the MCAS system started to autocorrect, pilots couldn't easily override it.

 

The combination created the issues. A software patch probably really would fix it.

 

 

The problem exhibited in this thread however probably wasn't the same thing. Its probably mostly getting attention bc of the previous issues. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.png.5a50ff01beddda9bc919bd0a400aac22.png

 

The Big VTard says "so you're an airplane engineer too huh? Want to play the math game? Can you tell me what are the odds are we have to take the horse cock again twice this year?" HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Edited by ManningEnvy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, reo said:

This isn't really a horrible idea. The problem is that the plane wasn't designed for that size engine which meant the aero was a little off and it would stall at higher angles of attack.

Yeah.  No biggie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/30/2019 at 8:54 PM, reo said:

Because I'm bored.

 

This essentially says that Boeing needed an aircraft with a stronger and more efficient engine to compete with competitors. So instead of designing a whole new aircraft, they took their 737 and put a bigger engine on it. 

 

This isn't really a horrible idea. The problem is that the plane wasn't designed for that size engine which meant the aero was a little off and it would stall at higher angles of attack. Angle of attack is essentially the angle of the wings in respect to the air flow. When you pitched up enough, the wings would stall and they'd lose lift.

 

Stick your hand out the window of a car and tilt it up. That's the angle of attack. Pitch it up more and more and at some point you'll stop feeling the air lifting your hand and you'll just feel the air pushing your hand back. That point, without getting too in depth, is basically stall.

 

So basically what they did was figured out what conditions the aircraft would start to stall and created software (MCAS) so the aircraft would autocorrect for it. This isn't typically a huge deal bc commercial aircraft don't really pitch up that drastically so they don't really stall often. They probably figured it'd never really happen (and actually it didn't).

 

Then they figured current 737 pilots would just need a run down of the changes with brief training to be up to speed.

 

The problem was 2 fold.

 

1) faulty sensors could make the plane incorrectly read that it was going into a stall

2) when the MCAS system started to autocorrect, pilots couldn't easily override it.

 

The combination created the issues. A software patch probably really would fix it.

 

 

The problem exhibited in this thread however probably wasn't the same thing. Its probably mostly getting attention bc of the previous issues. 

So... basically you're saying that the framus intersects with ramistan approximately at the paternoster, but they were trying to bypass the paternoster to the twattle throcket?

Edited by NashvilleNinja

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah.  He’s just making excuses for them.  Don’t know why he would do that.

 

But there is a subculture of engineers that make excuses for the bad work of others rather than holding them accountable.  Maybe they think it makes themselves look magnanimous or something, but at the end of the day, it spells “shit”.

 

Edited by Denali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, NashvilleNinja said:

So... basically you're saying that the framus intersects with ramistan approximately at the paternoster, but they were trying to bypass the paternoster to the twattle throcket?

It was the right philange.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.