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9 Nines

Scheme: parents paying $75K to get others to take SAT etc. tests

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Justafan   
2 hours ago, Denali said:

As I said earlier in the thread, the blame has to put on the SAT and ACT testing companies.  I don't see them surviving all of this once the lawsuits start coming.  They've been giving special-ed accommodations to test takers that aren't even enrolled in any special-ed schools or classes.  And it's ridiculous how they go about administering the tests. Way too much power is being given to the test administrators, and without having performed extensive background checks on those test administrators, this was bound to happen.

 

They will be sued into oblivion.  The Attorney General may even choose to shut them down first.

They have to accept responsibility for their part.  As should all the douchebags circumventing the system.

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begooode   
9 hours ago, Denali said:

As I said earlier in the thread, the blame has to put on the SAT and ACT testing companies.  I don't see them surviving all of this once the lawsuits start coming.  They've been giving special-ed accommodations to test takers that aren't even enrolled in any special-ed schools or classes.  And it's ridiculous how they go about administering the tests. Way too much power is being given to the test administrators, and without having performed extensive background checks on those test administrators, this was bound to happen.

 

They will be sued into oblivion.  The Attorney General may even choose to shut them down first.

You’re going way too easy on the parents, imo. Now if test administrators/coaches shook them down for a bribe, then yeah. Otherwise it was the parents who actively circumvented the process and illegally corrupted individuals with cash. They own that and should be punished, period, especially the orchestrator of the schemes. It’s a high publicity case to discourage our wealthiest from corrupting others.  Everything else is already tilted in their favor, just play by the damn rules.

 

As far as the admissions process, yep. That’s rife for examination. This maybe timely as it’s coming on top of the real discussion we need to have about funding and access to higher ed in the US.

 

,...And then Singer used the magic word. What made his services “so attractive to so many families,” he acknowledged, “is I created a guarantee.” In the hypercompetitive environment at elite schools, rich parents — who will settle for nothing less than the best (and most prestigious) school for their children — wanted certainty. Aware of how difficult it is to get, they were willing to pay a lot of money for a guarantee.

 

Gordon Caplan, who allegedly wired $75,000 to Singer to arrange a fabricated ACT score of 32 for his daughter (whose highest practice result was 22), we can assume, was not the only client who was “not worried about the moral issue here.”

 

“Keep in mind, I am a lawyer,” he allegedly told Singer, in a wire-tapped call, “So I’m sort of rules oriented.” Caplan expressed concern about the possibility of getting caught, but accepted Singer’s assurance that he would be safe.

 

https://thehill.com/opinion/education/434413-when-admission-to-college-is-guaranteed

 

Edited by begooode

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Denali   
7 hours ago, begooode said:

You’re going way too easy on the parents, imo. Now if test administrators/coaches shook them down for a bribe, then yeah. Otherwise it was the parents who actively circumvented the process and illegally corrupted individuals with cash. They own that and should be punished, period, especially the orchestrator of the schemes. It’s a high publicity case to discourage our wealthiest from corrupting others.  Everything else is already tilted in their favor, just play by the damn rules.

 

As far as the admissions process, yep. That’s rife for examination. This maybe timely as it’s coming on top of the real discussion we need to have about funding and access to higher ed in the US.

 

,...And then Singer used the magic word. What made his services “so attractive to so many families,” he acknowledged, “is I created a guarantee.” In the hypercompetitive environment at elite schools, rich parents — who will settle for nothing less than the best (and most prestigious) school for their children — wanted certainty. Aware of how difficult it is to get, they were willing to pay a lot of money for a guarantee.

 

Gordon Caplan, who allegedly wired $75,000 to Singer to arrange a fabricated ACT score of 32 for his daughter (whose highest practice result was 22), we can assume, was not the only client who was “not worried about the moral issue here.”

 

“Keep in mind, I am a lawyer,” he allegedly told Singer, in a wire-tapped call, “So I’m sort of rules oriented.” Caplan expressed concern about the possibility of getting caught, but accepted Singer’s assurance that he would be safe.

 

https://thehill.com/opinion/education/434413-when-admission-to-college-is-guaranteed

 

This whole thing was an inside job.  Plain and simple.

 

Without the people on the inside that were in on all of this, there would be nothing.  There are always going to be people looking to gain the system.  Rich and poor.  In the old days, tests were stolen before hand.  It happened many times before.  Cheating, or trying to cheat is nothing new.

 

Banks have vaults and security guards.  Networks have firewalls.  Cars, houses, and businesses have alarm systems.  Go ahead and try to steal something from the White House or the Pentagon.  Good luck with that.

 

That's why criminals look to be in cahoots with someone on the inside, so that they can get past the defenses that are already in place.  Not a new concept by any means.

 

So, for example, what happens when someone who has been trusted by the U.S. government sells secrets to foreign countries?  Do we say "Hey, how dare that foreign country do such a thing?".  Of course not.  It's to be expected.  That's why we have security measures in place and why there are extensive background checks done for people that would be trusted with that information.  And yes, extremely rarely, some sell secrets.  And they are convicted to the fullest extent of the law.  The fact that there are countries interested in getting that information IS A GIVEN.  And that's why there are also extreme penalties for not properly protecting the information, even if out of carelessness.  And those penalties are severe as well, and includes jail time.

 

So, what we have here are people on the inside that were put in a position of trust that went ahead and broke that trust and broke the law, purely for their own financial gain.  On purpose.  With intent.  They deserve most of the blame and all deserve extreme jail sentences (decades).  Just like what is done with other types of insiders.  Throw the fucking book at them.

 

And we have those institutions that were careless and didn't properly put in safeguards to prevent it from happening. Lax background checks, lax security policies, no peer reviews of documents (tests, applications, etc...).  They also deserve prosecution.  Throw the fucking book at them too.

 

Yes, the parents deserve jail time too, but the biggest culprits are the people on the inside.

 

 

Edited by Denali

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