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Gleanings From the Offseason

Started by Jamalisms, Apr 29 2013 03:44 PM

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#1

Jamalisms


POPULAR

Fans should go beyond player ratings and draft grades when assessing the draft. There is much to be learned.

 

The 2013 NFL draft is over and pundits everywhere are rushing out grades for NFL teams. This is how draft grades work:

  • Pundits rate draft prospects in an attempt to mimic and predict the evaluation process actual professionals are going through to determining which players to draft.
  • Teams reveal the results of the actual evaluation process by drafting said players.
  • Pundits compare their predictions to actual results. When they find discrepancies, actual results are denounced on the basis of what was predicted. Instead of admitting that pre-draft rankings were erroneous, pundits suggest that teams got it wrong.

Journalists produce these grades because fans want the validation of a third party to state that their team didn’t screw the pooch. Fans want to ‘win’ the draft. The problem is that careers aren’t made and determined in the draft. Until these players get out onto the field and acclimate into systems and either produce, or not, any grading of drafts is the tail wagging the dog.

Instead of looking at ‘who’ was drafted and trying to rate the quality of the player, fans would be better served by asking the question of ‘why’ players were drafted. Franchises have a limited, precious quantity of draft choices to utilize in trying to improve their respective teams for the coming year. How they use those draft picks suggests at management’s assessment of where the team’s biggest holes are. It also indicates something about team direction / philosophy. Combined with the ‘why’ of free agency moves, fans can learn a lot.

Here are four gleanings from the Titans offseason to date:

Gleaning 1: The Titans were thoroughly dissatisfied with their offensive line play.

To start the year, each position along the interior of the offensive line had a new starter. Steve Hutchinson was signed in the offseason to play Left Guard. The Titans’ starting Center from 2011 (Eugene Amano) was injured in preseason, forcing Fernando Velasco to start at Center. Leroy Harris, meanwhile, flipped from Left Guard in 2011 to Right Guard in 2012 in order to accommodate Hutchinson. Harris was also playing injured from day one. As the 2012 season progressed, the Titans fielded six different starting lineups along the offensive line. That’s a decent number of changes for a position group that benefits strongly from continuity.

As an added perspective, the lineup was unchanged through seven weeks which means that a lot of the turmoil that occurred was condensed into a smaller part of the year. In the final nine games of the 2012 season, the Titans fielded five different starting groups for the offensive line. The lineup was different in each of the final three weeks.

Certainly injuries affected the quality of offensive line play. Fernando Velasco was the only player involved on every offensive snap. The first lineup change came in week eight when Michael Roos missed a start at Left Tackle due to an emergency appendectomy. Right Guard Leroy Harris was injured against Indianapolis that same week. In week twelve the Titans lost both Hutchinson at Left Guard and David Stewart at Right Tackle. Mike Otto got sick right before the Green Bay game in week fifteen and Mitch Petrus’ play against Green Bay brought Kyle DeVan into the starting lineup to close out the season.

With so much change it was at least worthy of consideration how good the Titans line play could be in 2013 if injured players returned to health. After all, at least in terms of rushing the best game Chris Johnson turned in all year was week seven, (right before the line shuffling got started), and after rushing for 897 yards in weeks four through twelve, (sporting a 5.7 yard average during that time), Johnson’s rushing totals dipped dramatically back down from week thirteen on, during which time the offensive line was changed on a near-weekly basis.

With Steve Hutchinson retiring, the Titans were going to be forced to at least make some changes. Instead, they worked out a complete overhaul along the interior of the offensive line. Of the eighty total offensive line starts from last year, (5 positions x 16 games), players representing thirty-two of them are already gone. Those same players accounted for 1,997 of 4,989 offensive snaps. Only Roos, Stewart, Otto, Stingily and Velasco remain from all 2012 starters and four of those guys are tackles.

Andy Levitre, the best free agent guard on the market, was signed to a six year deal to play Left Guard. Chance Warmack was drafted with the tenth overall pick to play Right Guard. If newly drafted Center Brian Schwenke starts week one, the Titans will again have complete turnover along the interior of the offensive line. In this event the Titans would expect to have fifty-three of eighty starts coming from different players than the year before. Only Roos and Stewart, fifteen and twelve starts respectively, would project as starters from amongst all 2012 offensive linemen.

Eugene Amano is the only remaining interior starter left from 2011 and he is not expect to continue with the team. Fernando Velasco is the only interior starter remaining from 2012. The descent from 'Titans starter' into obscurity has been swift of late. As a final note, it bears mentioning that the Titans also signed interior linemen Rob Turner and Chris Spencer this year.

Gleaning 2: The Titans didn’t fault, but don’t entirely trust, Chris Johnson.

The interior offensive line was one of two hotly debated potential causes of the downturn in run game production in recent years. The other was Chris Johnson. While the two causes are interrelated and not exclusive, contrary to the general tone and flow of discussions amongst fans and media alike, Chris Johnson, (despite a $10 million salary), was retained moving forward into 2013. The interior of the Titans offensive line has been replaced almost to a man for the second year in a row. The juxtaposition of collective fates speaks for itself.

After signing Shonn Greene in free agency, (who will fill the role that Javon Ringer was too-oft injured to play), the Titans opted not to take a runningback in the 2013 draft. This suggests a level of comfort at the runningback position, which also speaks in favor of Chris Johnson.

At the same time, the Titans are paying Greene $10 million over three years. It’s partly a response to the frustrating reality of Ringer’s unfortunate injury history, but that they spent as much money as they did speaks to the importance of the backup position in their eyes. Given the surprising durability of Johnson, not to mention his already hefty price tag, placing that level of importance on his backup suggests a level of dissatisfaction despite that he was ultimately retained and will enter the season as the starter.

The Titans have endeavored to remove poor offensive line play from the running game equation. This is a vote of confidence for Johnson. They also paid for a viable and somewhat expensive backup plan. This is not a vote of confidence for Johnson. A make or break year looms for the Titans’ star runningback.

Gleaning 3: The Titans recognize that Jake Locker is not yet ready.

Jake Locker displaced Matt Hasselbeck as the head of the offense at the start the 2012 season. He was injured in week four and replaced by Matt Hasselbeck for five games before returning to close out the final seven games. Along the way, Locker posted a 74.0 passer rating on the year and exceeded 80.0 in only four of eleven games.

To avoid belaboring the point, a quick summary of his year is that he too-often failed to lead an effective offense and was generally outperformed by Matt Hasselbeck. Despite Locker having been outplayed by his backup, the Titans released said backup in the offseason. In the absence of productivity from Locker that speaks to a number of things.

It can be assumed that the Titans felt that Locker’s shoulder injury, which required offseason surgery, played a role in his overall poor performance post-return to the starting lineup. It can also be assumed that the same near-constant offensive line shuffling that occurred down the stretch and was seen as a big factor in Johnson’s play was also seen as a big factor in Locker’s play.

By shoring up the offensive line, the Titans are looking to improve the run game. The same offensive line re-work should also provide a more stable pocket for Locker to work with. In addition, the Titans used free agency to sign Delanie Walker who by all accounts will provide excellent blocking ability and lend flexibility to the offense. All of this coincides with Dowell Loggains stepping up to the Offensive Coordinator table with a stated refocusing on the run game as a means of easing pressure on Locker.

The run game and offensive line aren’t the only ways that the Titans are looking to ease things for Locker. The Titans pursued slot receivers in free agency, including likely expensive options. Ultimately, the biggest free agency signing at wide receiver was Kevin Walter but the Titans didn’t stop there. In a bold move, the Titans traded up in round two of the draft in order to select Justin Hunter. Hunter is projected as a deep threat and a red zone target. On the heels of having used the first round pick on an offensive player this year and last, drafting Hunter, (trading up to do so, no less), is a big investment in talent to put in place around Locker.

The Titans gave Locker a full season to develop under a quality veteran. This is a luxury few early draft picks get in today’s NFL. Results in 2012 were less than satisfactory and now the Titans are doubling-down on easing Locker’s transition to the NFL while also giving him more ownership by parting ways with Hasselbeck. Few players get this level of care and protection. More often, they are thrown to the wolves. That the Titans trust Locker enough to part from Hasselbeck is a sign of their commitment to him. That they feel the need to protect him by moving away from a passing offense and bringing in many and varied new offensive pieces is a sign of their recognition that he isn’t ready yet.

Gleaning 4: The Defense gave up a franchise record number of points, but the offense was seen as the unit to improve.

The Titans gave up 471 points on defense in 2012. This was dead last in the NFL and ranks as the worst total ever fielded by the franchise. To address this, the Titans signed two big-bodied, non-big-name defensive linemen who aren’t known for rushing the passer, (Sammy Lee Hill and Ropati Pitoitua), and two short-contract veteran safeties, (George Wilson and Bernard Pollard). They then spent their top two draft picks, and three of the top five, on offense.

The Titans added pieces on defense. They revamped and refocused on the offense. When fans and media discussed the lack of a consistent pass rush, the Titans discussed the need for size and an improved run defense. The Titans didn’t take a defensive lineman until the sixth round after adding size in free agency.

This was foreshadowed a bit in the season wrap-up press conference when Munchak responded somewhat testily to questions from ESPN AFC South blogger and 104.5 radio personality Paul Kuharsky. Retaining the services of Jerry Gray also indicated a level of “ok-ness” with how the defense performed the prior year, which itself was somewhat foreshadowed by the late-season firing of offensive coordinator Chris Palmer instead of Gray.

The actual play by play and flow of games bears out much of the emphasis on offense over defense. In numerous games the Titans held opponents relatively in-check defensively in the first half while the offense sputtered drive after drive. As the games progressed, the defense wore down and gave up points in chunks.

The Titans held the Texans to 14 first half points in week four. Houston scored no points in the second quarter. During that same half the Titans offense had five drives. Four of them lasted four plays or less, each eating up less than two minutes of the clock. In week five the Titans held Minnesota to 13 first half points. The Titans offense had six drives in the first half. Four of them resulted in punts, the other two ended with a fumble and an interception. Five of six drives lasted five plays or less.

There are plenty more examples of the offense hurting the defense, including numerous drives starting inside the defensive red-zone or across the fifty yard line due to turnovers. Against San Diego the Titans went three-and-out six times, had another drive end in an interception on the second play and saw yet another drive last four plays for seven yards. The Titans punted six times on three-and-outs against the Jets. On two more drives the Titans punted after four plays and on yet another they punted after five plays. The Titans’ first three drives against Green Bay went three-and-out. The next two ended in interceptions on the third play. There were two turnovers on downs and another five punts after that. Until the Titans’ final drive, (that started with less than three minutes to go), their longest drive was 33 yards. They had four drives that went for negative yardage.

Yes, an offense can make their own defense look bad. In the Titans’ case it made the defense look worse (i.e. they weren’t great to begin with). The Titans worked to improve on both offense and defense, but they placed a premium on righting the ship offensively and are generally letting the status-quo ride on defense, personnel-wise.

Why has the 2012 offseason moved forward in the manner we have all witnessed? By all indications the Titans feel that fortune in 2013 will depend on Jake Locker. If he catches his stride - the team will improve. Efficient, stable play from the QB is the goal and they’re trying to accomplish it by whatever means necessary. That is why.

Follow Titans Report on Twitter: @TitansReport
Follow Jamal on Twitter: @Jamalisms

Click here to view the article



#2

Jamalisms

Some of the themes from this article were discussed in this thread already.  Tip of the hat to @code:

http://www.titansrep...ce-have-spoken/



#3

Jamal's Boss

Fans should go beyond player ratings and draft grades when assessing the draft. There is much to be learned.

 

The 2013 NFL draft is over and pundits everywhere are rushing out grades for NFL teams. This is how draft grades work:

  • Pundits rate draft prospects in an attempt to mimic and predict the evaluation process actual professionals are going through to determining which players to draft.
  • Teams reveal the results of the actual evaluation process by drafting said players.
  • Pundits compare their predictions to actual results. When they find discrepancies, actual results are denounced on the basis of what was predicted. Instead of admitting that pre-draft rankings were erroneous, pundits suggest that teams got it wrong.

Journalists produce these grades because fans want the validation of a third party to state that their team didn’t screw the pooch. Fans want to ‘win’ the draft. The problem is that careers aren’t made and determined in the draft. Until these players get out onto the field and acclimate into systems and either produce, or not, any grading of drafts is the tail wagging the dog.

Instead of looking at ‘who’ was drafted and trying to rate the quality of the player, fans would be better served by asking the question of ‘why’ players were drafted. Franchises have a limited, precious quantity of draft choices to utilize in trying to improve their respective teams for the coming year. How they use those draft picks suggests at management’s assessment of where the team’s biggest holes are. It also indicates something about team direction / philosophy. Combined with the ‘why’ of free agency moves, fans can learn a lot.

Here are four gleanings from the Titans offseason to date:

Gleaning 1: The Titans were thoroughly dissatisfied with their offensive line play.

To start the year, each position along the interior of the offensive line had a new starter. Steve Hutchinson was signed in the offseason to play Left Guard. The Titans’ starting center from 2011 (Eugene Amano) was injured in preseason, forcing Fernando Velasco to start at Center. Leroy Harris, meanwhile, flipped from Left Guard in 2011 to Right Guard in 2012 in order to accommodate Hutchinson. Harris was also playing injured from day one. As the 2012 season progressed, the Titans fielded six different starting lineups along the offensive line. That’s a decent number of changes for a position group that benefits strongly from continuity

As an added perspective, the lineup was unchanged through seven weeks which means that a lot of the turmoil that occurred was condensed into a smaller part of the year. In the final nine games of the 2012 season, the Titans fielded five different starting groups for the offensive line. The lineup was different in each of the final three weeks.

Certainly injuries affected the quality of offensive line play. Fernando Velasco was the only player involved on every offensive snap. The first lineup change came in week eight when Michael Roos missed a start at Left Tackle due to an emergency appendectomy. Right Guard Leroy Harris was injured against Indianapolis that same week. In week twelve the Titans lost both Hutchinson at Left Guard and David Stewart at Right Tackle. Mike Otto got sick right before the Green Bay game in week fifteen and Mitch Petrus’ play against Green Bay brought Kyle DeVan into the starting lineup to close out the season.

With so much change it was at least worthy of consideration how good the Titans line play could be in 2013 if injured players returned to health. After all, at least in terms of rushing the best game Chris Johnson turned in all year was week seven, (right before the line shuffling got started), and after rushing for 897 yards in weeks four through twelve, (sporting a 5.7 yard average during that time), Johnson’s rushing totals dipped dramatically back down from week thirteen on, during which time the offensive line was changed on a near-weekly basis.

With Steve Hutchinson retiring, the Titans were going to be forced to at least make some changes. Instead, they worked out a complete overhaul along the interior of the offensive line. Of the eighty total offensive line starts from last year, (5 positions x 16 games), players representing thirty-two of them are already gone. Those same players accounted for 1,997 of 4,989 offensive snaps. Only Roos, Stewart, Otto, Stingily and Velasco remain from all 2012 starters and four of those guys are tackles.

Andy Levitre, the best free agent guard on the market, was signed to a six year deal to play Left Guard. Chance Warmack was drafted with the tenth overall pick to play Right Guard. If newly drafted Center Brian Schwenke starts week one, the Titans will again have complete turnover along the interior of the offensive line. In this event the Titans would expect to have fifty-three of eighty starts coming from different players than the year before. Only Roos and Stewart, fifteen and twelve starts respectively, would project as starters from amongst all 2012 offensive linemen.

Eugene Amano is the only remaining interior starter left from 2011 and he is not expect to continue with the team. Fernando Velasco is the only interior starter remaining from 2012. The descent into obscurity from a Titans starter has been swift of late. As a final note, it bears mentioning that the Titans also signed interior linemen Rob Turner and Chris Spencer this year.

Gleaning 2: The Titans didn’t fault, but don’t entirely trust, Chris Johnson.

The interior offensive line was one of two hotly debated potential causes of the downturn in run game production in recent years. The other was Chris Johnson. While the two causes are interrelated and not exclusive, contrary to the general tone and flow of discussions amongst fans and media alike, Chris Johnson, (despite a $10 million salary), was retained moving forward into 2013. The interior of the Titans offensive line has been replaced almost to a man for the second year in a row. The juxtaposition of collective fates speaks for itself.

After signing Shonn Greene in free agency, (who will fill the role that Javon Ringer was too-oft injured to play), the Titans opted not to take a runningback in the 2013 draft. This suggests a level of comfort at the runningback position, which also speaks in favor of Chris Johnson.

At the same time, the Titans are paying Greene $10 million over three years. It’s partly a response to the frustrating reality of Ringer’s unfortunate injury history, but that they spent as much money as they did speaks to the importance of the backup position in their eyes. Given the surprising durability of Johnson, not to mention his already hefty price tag, placing that level of importance on his backup suggests a level of dissatisfaction despite that he was ultimately retained and will enter the season as the starter.

The Titans have endeavored to remove poor offensive line play from the running game equation. This is a vote of confidence for Johnson. They also paid for a viable and somewhat expensive backup plan. This is not a vote of confidence for Johnson. A make or break year looms for the Titans’ star runningback.

Gleaning 3: The Titans recognize that Jake Locker is not yet ready.

Jake Locker displaced Matt Hasselbeck as the head of the offense at the start the 2012 season. He was injured in week four and replaced by Matt Hasselbeck for five games before returning to close out the final seven games. Along the way, Locker posted a 74.0 passer rating on the year and exceeded 80.0 in only four of eleven games.

To avoid belaboring the point, a quick summary of his year is that he too-often failed to lead an effective offense and was generally outperformed by Matt Hasselbeck. Despite Locker having been outplayed by his backup, the Titans released said backup in the offseason. In the absence of productivity from Locker that speaks to a number of things.

It can be assumed that the Titans felt that Locker’s shoulder injury, which required offseason surgery, played a role in his overall poor performance post-return to the starting lineup. It can also be assumed that the same near-constant offensive line shuffling that occurred down the stretch and was seen as a big factor in Johnson’s play was also seen as a big factor in Locker’s play.

By shoring up the offensive line, the Titans are looking to improve the run game. The same offensive line re-work should also provide a more stable pocket for Locker to work with. In addition, the Titans signed used free agency to sign Delanie Walker who by all accounts will provide excellent blocking ability and lend flexibility to the offense. All of this coincides with Dowell Loggains stepping up to the Offensive Coordinator table with a stated refocusing on the run game as a means of easing pressure on Locker.

The run game and offensive line aren’t the only ways that the Titans are looking to ease things for Locker. The Titans pursued slot receivers in free agency, including likely expensive options. Ultimately, the biggest free agency signing at wide receiver was Kevin Walter but the Titans didn’t stop there. In a bold move, the Titans traded up in round two of the draft in order to select Justin Hunter. Hunter is projected as a deep threat and a red zone target. On the heels of having used the first round pick on an offensive player this year and last, drafting Hunter, (trading up to do so, no less), is a big investment in talent to put in place around Locker.

The Titans gave Locker a full season to develop under a quality veteran. This is a luxury few early draft picks get in today’s NFL. Results in 2012 were less than satisfactory and now the Titans are doubling-down on easing Locker’s transition to the NFL while also giving him more ownership by parting ways with Hasselbeck. Few players get this level of care and protection. More often, they are thrown to the wolves. That the Titans trust Locker enough to part from Hasselbeck is a sign of their commitment to him. That they feel the need to protect him by moving away from a passing offense and bringing in many and varied new offensive pieces is a sign of their recognition that he isn’t ready yet.

Gleaning 4: The Defense gave up a franchise record number of points, but the offense was seen as the unit to improve.

The Titans gave up 471 points on defense in 2012. This was dead last in the NFL and ranks as the worst total ever fielded by the franchise. To address this, the Titans signed two big-bodied, non-big-name defensive linemen who aren’t known for rushing the passer and two short-contract veteran safeties. They then spent their top two draft picks, and three of the top five, on offense.

The Titans added pieces on defense. They revamped and refocused on the offense. When fans and media discussed the lack of a consistent pass rush, the Titans discussed the need for size improved run defense. The Titans didn’t take a defensive lineman until the sixth round after adding size in free agency.

This was foreshadowed a bit in the season wrap-up press conference when Munchak responded somewhat testily to questions from ESPN AFC South Blogger and 104.5 radio personality Paul Kuharsky. Retaining the services of Jerry Gray also indicated a level of “ok-ness” with how the defense performed the prior year, which itself was somewhat foreshadowed by the late-season firing of offensive coordinator Chris Palmer instead of Gray.

The actual play by play and flow of games bears out much of the emphasis on offense over defense. In numerous games the Titans held opponents relatively in-check defensively in the first half while the offense sputtered drive after drive. As the games progressed, the defense wore down and gave up points in chunks.

The Titans held the Texans to 14 first half points in week four. Houston scored no points in the second quarter. During that same half the Titans offense had five drives. Four of them lasted four plays or less, each eating up less than two minutes of the clock. In week five the Titans held Minnesota to 13 first half points. The Titans offense had six drives in the first half. Four of them resulted in punts, the other two ended with a fumble and an interception. Five of six drives lasted five plays or less.

There are plenty more examples of the offense hurting the defense, including numerous drives starting inside the defensive red-zone or across the fifty yard line due to turnovers. Against San Diego the Titans went three-and-out six times, had another drive end in an interception on the second play and saw yet another drive last four plays for seven yards. The Titans punted six times on three-and-outs against the Jets. On two more drives the Titans punted after four plays and on yet another they punted after five plays. The Titans’ first three drives against Green Bay went three-and-out. The next two ended in interceptions on the third play. There were two turnovers on downs and another five punts after that. Until the Titans’ final drive, (that started with less than three minutes to go), their longest drive was 33 yards. They had four drives that went for negative yardage.

Yes, an offense can make their own defense look bad. In the Titans’ case it made the defense look worse (i.e. they weren’t great to begin with). The Titans worked to improve on both offense and defense, but they placed a premium on righting the ship offensively and are generally letting the status-quo ride on defense, personnel-wise.

Why has the 2012 offseason moved forward in the manner we have all witnessed? By all indications the Titans feel that fortune in 2013 will depend on the Jake Locker. If he catches his stride - the team will improve. Efficient, stable play from the QB is the goal and they’re trying to accomplish it by whatever means necessary. That is why.

Click here to view the article

 

 

Is this your way of telling me I am not going to have that report on my desk by 6:00 PM? 



#4

prometheus


Solid post, Jamal. I'll bet the coaching staff, i.e. Munchak and Gray and the OC munchkin, would not have done a better job of describing the bases for the decisions made in the off-season and the draft.

pro

#5

Justafan

Solid points and some stuff to consider when discussing draft picks this year.  



#6

CMJ
  • CMJ
  • Contributor
  • 18,692 posts

Is this your way of telling me I am not going to have that report on my desk by 6:00 PM?


Hahahaga!

I'm dying! Hahah

#7

IowaOiler

Can you do the same style article on the Rams?  I know at least one poster who would really enjoy it.



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#8

oldschool

This guy loves to hear himself think.

#9

OILERMAN

This guy loves to hear himself think.

 

How many different ways can one defend Chris Johnson's ineptitude?



#10

notsolegato

How many different ways can one defend Chris Johnson's ineptitude?

It's interesting that the Titans passed on Eddie Lacy, Gio Bernard, Jonathan Franklin,  Zac Stacy, Steven Jackson, and Ahmad Bradshaw during the offseason but did add three new starting interior OL. 



#11

Jamalisms

Solid post, Jamal. I'll bet the coaching staff, i.e. Munchak and Gray and the OC munchkin, would not have done a better job of describing the bases for the decisions made in the off-season and the draft.

pro

Thanks pro. They probably could and would tell me all the reasons I'm wrong... but they aren't here to do that so I'll just assume I'm spot on.

#12

Jonboy


POPULAR

Whether you agree with Jamal or not, the guy puts a crap-ton of hours into writing these stories, which work together with the forums, podcast, twitter feed, etc... to bring more posters to the site. I, for one, appreciate the effort he puts into these because it's not easy.



#13

Soxcat

How many different ways can one defend Chris Johnson's ineptitude?

 

As usual you are clueless.  CJ has not been stellar.  We all know that.  But trying to continue to make CJ as the same as Eddie George near the end of his career is just plain stupid.  CJ still has a burst and can still make big plays.  And those plays come less often when you are getting hit in the back field as soon as you get the ball.  So it is obvious to anyone with half a football mind that the right way to proceed was to fix the OL and I've been saying we needed to do that if CJ stayed or not.  Quite honestly the addition of Greene was to basically give us a different RB but maybe most importantly it allowed us to free up a 3-5 round pick we would have had to use on one.  IMO the FO and coaching staff are on the right track.  It is obvious what they are trying to do as in get a few big plays from the RB spot to help Locker.  Now we see if the startegy works or not.   



#14

Jamalisms

Whether you agree with Jamal or not, the guy puts a crap-ton of hours into writing these stories, which work together with the forums, podcast, twitter feed, etc... to bring more posters to the site. I, for one, appreciate the effort he puts into these because it's not easy.

Thank you... thank you all... thank you... ok, stop clapping.

Thank you all from the bottom of my heart. But please, don't make this about me.

I do it for the children.

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#15

OILERMAN

It's interesting that the Titans passed on Eddie Lacy, Gio Bernard, Jonathan Franklin, Zac Stacy, Steven Jackson, and Ahmad Bradshaw during the offseason but did add three new starting interior OL.


It would be interesting if they didn't pay Greene a ton of money as a #2




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